Announcements

Check back here regularly to learn about Luskin Center activities, new reports, and other noteworthy updates about our work.

Welcome to our new LCHP Post-Doctoral Scholar, Dr. Ben Zdencanovic

The Luskin Center for History and Policy is pleased to welcome Dr. Ben Zdencanovic as its first Postdoctoral Scholar! Dr. Zdencanovic will be advancing the center’s research, public programming, and overall mission. Read more about him below. Welcome, Dr. Zdencanovic!

About Ben Zdencanovic

Ben Zdencanovic (pronounced sten-CHAN-oh-vich) is a Postdoctoral Associate at the UCLA Luskin Center for History and Policy. Ben is a historian of the United States in the world, domestic and international politics, and economic and social policy. He has a particular interest in the relationship between U.S. global power and the politics of redistribution and welfare state.

Ben is currently working on two book projects. The first, tentatively titled Island of Enterprise: The End of the New Deal and the Rise of U.S. Global Power in a World of Welfare, 1940 – 1955, traces connections between the end of New Deal reformism, the rise of U.S. global power, and the birth of social and economic rights and the modern welfare state around the world in the mid-twentieth century. His second book is a major reevaluation of the “War on Poverty” in the 1960s, viewing it as a political-economic response to the manpower imperatives of racial capitalism, the Cold War national security state, and the unfolding conflict in Vietnam.

Ben has published peer-reviewed articles Journal of Transatlantic Studies and the Radical History Review. In addition to his scholarly writing, he has written essays on history, policy, and politics for popular audiences in outlets such as Jacobin, the Boston Review, and the Washington Post. His writing and research have been supported by numerous grants and fellowships from such sources as the Yale Macmillan Center, the Rockefeller Archive Center, the Roosevelt and Truman presidential libraries, the University of Illinois Foundation, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Ben earned his doctorate with distinction from the Department of History at Yale in 2019, where his dissertation was the winner of the Edwin W. Small Prize for outstanding work in United States history. Prior to coming to UCLA, Ben was a postdoctoral fellow at the Yale Jackson School for Global Affairs and an Assistant Instructional Professor at the University of Chicago.

LCHP Funded Research on “Racism by Design” Published

Journal of the American Planning Association: Vol 88, No 3 (Current issue)

LCHP Funded Research about Asian Immigration and the Adoption of Planning and Design Regulations in Three Los Angeles Suburbs

UCLA graduate student Hao Ding and Professor Anastasia Loukaitou-Sideris recently published a peer-reviewed article “Racism by Design? Asian Immigration and the Adoption of Planning and Design Regulations in Three Los Angeles Suburbs” in the Journal of the American Planning Association. Based on their research supported by LCHP, Ding and Loukaitou-Sideris examine the exclusionary effects of land use and design controls in three Los Angeles County cities.

Read their published article here.

LCHP releases report on UCLA’s response to crisis throughout history

LCHP releases report on UCLA’s response to crisis throughout history

The Luskin Center is not only devoted to producing a new mode of research that brings historical depth to issues of policy relevance and urgency.  We are also deeply committed to marshaling the exceptional talents of student researchers, both undergraduate and graduate.  At the same time, we are intent on examining critically our own university environment, especially in the wake of the call for self-reckoning that followed the murder of George Floyd in May 2020.

In this spirit, we are pleased to launch a suite of three new LCHP research reports, all of which have been spearheaded by UCLA graduate and undergraduate students.  The first paper explores the stunning rise and longer-term consequences of contingent academic labor in the University of California system. The second is devoted to the history of race and racism at UCLA, focusing on forgotten personalities and chapters now brought to the light of day.  The third report, released below, took rise in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic and investigates how UCLA responded to past crises of major scale.

As a whole, these reports offer a much-needed critical and constructive perspective on the institution that we call home. It is our hope that a thorough and honest exploration can show the path to a better and more just UCLA community.  As always, we welcome your feedback and input on this important body of research.

University in Crisis: Challenges and Responses During the Formative Years of the Young Administration at UCLA

The UCLA Luskin Center for History and Policy is pleased to release the final report in a new series about the history of the UC and UCLA.

The third and final report in this series investigates the university’s response to crises of major scale. They examine administrators’ approaches to two events in the late 1960s: 1) the student movement for ethnic studies, and 2) the on-campus killings of students Bunchy Carter and and John Huggins.

This report was researched and written by Jazz Kiang, Grace Hae Rim Shin, Nayiri Artounians, Jannelle Dang, Victoria Pfau, and Sarah Son.

The first research team examining this topic included Jessica Guzmán, Kayleah Kellybrew, Matt Philips, Mariam Zahran, and Nicole Zhang.

To read the paper, click [HERE].

Listen to report authors Jazz Kiang, Jannelle Dang, and Nayiri Artounians in conversation with Professor Eddie Cole about their research in the below podcast episode:

LCHP Releases Report on Racism and the Quest for Racial Justice at UCLA

LCHP Releases Report on Racism and the Quest for Racial Justice at UCLA

The Luskin Center is not only devoted to producing a new mode of research that brings historical depth to issues of policy relevance and urgency.  We are also deeply committed to marshaling the exceptional talents of student researchers, both undergraduate and graduate.  At the same time, we are intent on examining critically our own university environment, especially in the wake of the call for self-reckoning that followed the murder of George Floyd in May 2020.

In this spirit, we are pleased to launch a suite of three new LCHP research reports, all of which have been spearheaded by UCLA graduate and undergraduate students.  The first paper explores the stunning rise and longer-term consequences of contingent academic labor in the University of California system.  The second, released below, is devoted to the history of race and racism at UCLA, focusing on forgotten personalities and chapters now brought to the light of day.  The third report, to be released in early April, took rise in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic and investigates how UCLA responded to past crises of major scale.

As a whole, these reports offer a much-needed critical and constructive perspective on the institution that we call home. It is our hope that a thorough and honest exploration can show the path to a better and more just UCLA community.  As always, we welcome your feedback and input on this important body of research.

The History of Racism and the Quest for Racial Justice at UCLA

The UCLA Luskin Center for History and Policy is pleased to release a new series of reports about the history of the UC and UCLA.

The second report in this series investigates the long history of race and racism at UCLA. It examines the experiences and treatment of students of color throughout the university’s history, as well as examples of the individuals and movements that led the fight for racial justice at UCLA.

This report was researched and written by a team of over a dozen graduate and undergraduate student researchers conducted research over the past year and a half. They include: Desmond Fonseca, Mariana Gonzalez, Ariel Nicole Hart, Nadeeka Karunaratne, Armond Lee, Gabriela Legaspi, Kosi Ogbuli, Héctor Osorio, Abdullah Puckett, Debanjan Roychoudhury, Marisol Sánchez Castillo, Alexa Sass, Kateri Son, Skylar Weatherford.

To read the paper, click [HERE].

Listen to report authors Debanjan Roychoudhury, Kateri Son, and Skylar Weatherford in conversation with Professor Aomar Boum about their research in the podcast episode